Connecting With Your Why

Life is so full of distractions and things that take us out of our writing and our over all purpose and goals. Its not something that can be helped, but it can be structured. Making a list of questions why I am the way that I am and the reasons why I do what I do is needed for being a small fish in a big big pond of talented writers, runners and bloggers. Watching so many people out there, doing what they do and what you do is inspiring but it can also open the flood gates to comparison.

Comparison is the enemy of creativity.

So in a sea of super talented, super amazing and super inspiring people, it is important to remember that even before social media, this was a thing. Do you think that Shakespeare was the only creative play write out there? Do you think that Hawking was the only scientist? No.

Still logic doesn’t always set in and even knowing there very basic things and beleiving in yourself doesn’t help the gloomies sometimes when writers block sets in. Never mind when the mean comments that people throw around end up in your inbox.

It’s in moments like this that it is especially important that you know and can revisit your most basic and fundamental ‘why’ questions. Not only will they help you move forward but they make you find purpose in the movement instead of just mindlessly drumming out posts, running the miles or writing sentence after sentence without any sort of passion.

Stay honest and stay truthful. Remember that if something doesn’t give you the joy that it once did, does not mean that you are a failure at it.

Why did you start in the first place?: Everything that you do should be a labor of love. At least in my book. Remember how you feel when you do this thing. Take into account you goals. Reflect on what you want out of life and how what you are doing is working or not working.

Be honest with yourself and respect yourself from a non judgemental of morality driven place.

Is what you’re doing in line with who you are/your values currently?: We all change. It sometimes talks years, sometimes it takes minutes. Your goals in your 20’s are probably not the same as your goals in your thirties. If this thing that you are doing isn’t working for you anymore or is no longer bringing you joy you must remember:

That does NOT make you a failure.

Do not be afraid to switch your path to something that serves this you. Do not cling to an era of your life just because you started it. I’m not saying you shouldn’t strive but you shouldn’t consider yourself a failure for switching to something that brings you happiness.

Are you doing this for you or for someone else?: I’m never going to “Win” a marathon. 99.9% of what I write will live in solitude in between me and my computer or notebooks. Remind yourself that you believe in you and that the validation of the world does not define success or failure. You define that for yourself. Are you happy with what you are doing? How do you feel when you are doing it? Do you need validation to find joy in it? Or does the joy come from the act or from the validation?



Remember that you do not have to wait until the writers block really kicks in to start asking yourself these questions. I would recommend asking yourself these when you set your monthly or yearly intentions too. Some of the people that I know ever ask themselves these things when the new moon is out, during lent, or before some other meaningful life event, just as a touchstone for their lives.

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There is a time in our lives when we figure out that we are adults. When that time is...we sometimes don't know. Even at 32. I'm just a young woman trying to restart and learn how to live as an adult after years of just making ends meet. Coming out of a divorce was something horrid for my plans, but opening up to my authentic self and finding joy in the things I love has been a huge step forward. Becoming an adult isn't about the age you are at, but being comfortable in what you do, what you love and who you are. Marathoner Certified Nutrition Coach (Pn1) Writer Cook Pocket Philosopher

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